A national discussion on unnecessary care #ChoosingWisely #Canada

I am sharing this in case it has not made the rounds. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)/Choosing Wisely Canada (CWC) report, Unnecessary Care in Canada, should be available in April. In the meantime you can read briefly about CIHI's role with CWChere.

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A National Discussion: Unnecessary Care in Canada

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) and Choosing Wisely Canada (CWC) invite you to join us for a discussion on the extent of unnecessary care in Canada.

This webinar will introduce a new CIHI/CWC report, Unnecessary Care in Canada, and facilitate a conversation about the magnitude of and variation in unnecessary care across several areas covered by CWC’s recommendations.

The event will include

  • A moderated panel discussion with:
    • David O’Toole, President and CEO, CIHI;
    • Dr. Wendy Levinson, Chair and Co-Founder, CWC; and
    • Dr. Laurent Marcoux, President-Elect, Canadian Medical Association
  • Speakers from the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, North York General Hospital and other organizations, who will share their success stories about addressing unnecessary care
  • Q & A session

Date: April 6, 2017
Time: 9 to 10:30 a.m. ET

Please note that this webinar will be conducted in English only and will use Eastern Time. To accommodate multiple time zones, a recorded copy of the webinar will be made available. When you register, please specify if you would like the recorded version.

Registration: To participate, you must have access to the internet, as well as speakers/headphones. The webinar will be accessible on iOS and Android devices (both mobile phones and tablets).

To register for the webinar, please email Alison Clement at aclement@cihi.ca

Choosing Wisely Canada Talks

Earlier this month, I participated in a Choosing Wisely Canada Talks webinar. Drs Kimberly Wintemute and Anthony Train shared insights around a clinician's professional obligations and led a discussion around practical tips for having conversations with patients in these scenarios. You can see their talk and others in the Choosing Wisely Canada Talks series online.

This primary care discussion was incredibly relevant, and we covered a few tough topics including:

  1. A healthy patient requesting non-indicated screening blood work
  2. A patient requesting unnecessary imaging eg. MRI for lower back pain
  3. When a naturopath has told patient to ask MD to order a series of blood work
  4. A patient with a viral infection insisting on antibiotics
  5. Chronic use of sedatives/hypnotics including benzodiazepines in an older patient

It was great to have a mixture of people, including a patient voice, in the webinar. Some of the themes that emerged were around building a trusting relationship, exploring the patient's fears or goals and addressing those, having a discussion about risks vs benefits, using analogies/humour to convey a message, and using physical exam and other techniques to reassure patients.


"Choosing Wisely Talks take place on the 1st Thursday of every month from 12pm-1pm ET. Each workshop is led by an inspiring guest speaker, usually someone who has made significant gains in implementing the Choosing Wisely recommendations. Through a webinar format, participants tune-in to a live presentation by the guest speaker, followed by an interactive Q&A discussion. Participants usually leave each workshop with:

  • A greater appreciation for the impact of overuse
  • Ideas and inspiration for their own Choosing Wisely implementation project
  • A better grasp on potential barriers and opportunities to successful implementation"

 

Go to the website and use the right-hand menu to add these valuable events to your calendar or sign up for the newsletter. The next session is November 3rd from 12-1PM Eastern Time.

Choosing Wisely Canada: 3rd Wave of Reccomendations

Choosing Wisely Canada has released their 3rd wave of recommendations!

Groups like the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP), Canadian Society of Hospital Medicine (CSHM), three psychiatry groups (Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Canadian Academy of Geriatric Psychiatry, Canadian Psychiatric Association) and three surgical groups (Canadian Spine Society, Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery) have all developed lists of the top things that patients and doctors should question. The Canadian Society for Transfusion Medicine also added 5 new recommendations. See the new recommendations here.

This round was particularly interesting for me as I got to witness the process of the development of the CSHM list and participate in some stages, though not extensively. It's a tough task, whittling down all the ideas to find well-evidenced items that represent key areas for improvement, and try to avoid duplication of other specialty society recommendations. The group has to consider that many things which are good ideas and really really important to tackle, may not be suitable as the evidence behind them may be vague.

For example, though we all felt that discussing 'goals of care' or advance directives and resuscitation statuses (eg. DNR) with patients is very important, there's little data about why/how/when this should happen and what impact it actually has on patient well-being. Should it be discussed by the hospitalist? The GP? On all admissions? Only when a patient's status changes?

Ultimately it was impossible to make a firm statement that was robustly rooted in evidence, though our 'gut' feeling was strongly that we need to be having these discussions and that patients and doctors both should be starting conversations on the subject.

Choosing Wisely, as ever, forms a great starting place for discussing overuse of harmful and unnecessary tests and treatments. Yes, some of the recommendations are 'low-hanging fruit' but we have to start somewhere, and Choosing Wisely is great at getting us started talking about the facts that "more is not always better" in medicine.

Source: http://www.choosingwisely.ca