Choosing Wisely Canada: 3rd Wave of Reccomendations

Choosing Wisely Canada has released their 3rd wave of recommendations!

Groups like the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP), Canadian Society of Hospital Medicine (CSHM), three psychiatry groups (Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Canadian Academy of Geriatric Psychiatry, Canadian Psychiatric Association) and three surgical groups (Canadian Spine Society, Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery) have all developed lists of the top things that patients and doctors should question. The Canadian Society for Transfusion Medicine also added 5 new recommendations. See the new recommendations here.

This round was particularly interesting for me as I got to witness the process of the development of the CSHM list and participate in some stages, though not extensively. It's a tough task, whittling down all the ideas to find well-evidenced items that represent key areas for improvement, and try to avoid duplication of other specialty society recommendations. The group has to consider that many things which are good ideas and really really important to tackle, may not be suitable as the evidence behind them may be vague.

For example, though we all felt that discussing 'goals of care' or advance directives and resuscitation statuses (eg. DNR) with patients is very important, there's little data about why/how/when this should happen and what impact it actually has on patient well-being. Should it be discussed by the hospitalist? The GP? On all admissions? Only when a patient's status changes?

Ultimately it was impossible to make a firm statement that was robustly rooted in evidence, though our 'gut' feeling was strongly that we need to be having these discussions and that patients and doctors both should be starting conversations on the subject.

Choosing Wisely, as ever, forms a great starting place for discussing overuse of harmful and unnecessary tests and treatments. Yes, some of the recommendations are 'low-hanging fruit' but we have to start somewhere, and Choosing Wisely is great at getting us started talking about the facts that "more is not always better" in medicine.

Source: http://www.choosingwisely.ca