Wake up and smell the #overdiagnosis

Alan Cassels is not a shy kind of guy. He tells it like it is and is not one to stay quiet even if what he says may be unpopular. 

And usually it is pretty unpopular. 

However, it is necessary. From calling out the BC government's inaction on Choosing Wisely to fighting the overmedication of Canadian seniors and digging into the Sex, drugs, and rockin' beat of tramadol and tramacet's marketing machine, he is not afraid to talk about the elephants in the room, when it seems no one else is willing.

 

Cassels is a policy analyst, author, and champion debunker when it comes to pharmaceutical policy and the medicalization of Canadians.

In his most recent article for Focus Magazine, Cassels highlighted the Preventing Overdiagnosis conference, the harms of prostate cancer screening, and my perspective on the issues. 

I've had the chance to work with Cassels on a few small projects but to be called a 'resistor' by him feels like quite a pretty high honour! Check it out in Focus.

Choosing Wisely Canada Talks

Earlier this month, I participated in a Choosing Wisely Canada Talks webinar. Drs Kimberly Wintemute and Anthony Train shared insights around a clinician's professional obligations and led a discussion around practical tips for having conversations with patients in these scenarios. You can see their talk and others in the Choosing Wisely Canada Talks series online.

This primary care discussion was incredibly relevant, and we covered a few tough topics including:

  1. A healthy patient requesting non-indicated screening blood work
  2. A patient requesting unnecessary imaging eg. MRI for lower back pain
  3. When a naturopath has told patient to ask MD to order a series of blood work
  4. A patient with a viral infection insisting on antibiotics
  5. Chronic use of sedatives/hypnotics including benzodiazepines in an older patient

It was great to have a mixture of people, including a patient voice, in the webinar. Some of the themes that emerged were around building a trusting relationship, exploring the patient's fears or goals and addressing those, having a discussion about risks vs benefits, using analogies/humour to convey a message, and using physical exam and other techniques to reassure patients.


"Choosing Wisely Talks take place on the 1st Thursday of every month from 12pm-1pm ET. Each workshop is led by an inspiring guest speaker, usually someone who has made significant gains in implementing the Choosing Wisely recommendations. Through a webinar format, participants tune-in to a live presentation by the guest speaker, followed by an interactive Q&A discussion. Participants usually leave each workshop with:

  • A greater appreciation for the impact of overuse
  • Ideas and inspiration for their own Choosing Wisely implementation project
  • A better grasp on potential barriers and opportunities to successful implementation"

 

Go to the website and use the right-hand menu to add these valuable events to your calendar or sign up for the newsletter. The next session is November 3rd from 12-1PM Eastern Time.

Use your B.R.A.I.N. A Decision Support Tool

The Centre for Collaboration, Motivation, and Innovation (CCMI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to building skills and confidence for better health and health care. Their vision is "to improve health outcomes through helping people take active roles in their health."

The BRAIN Informed Decision Making Aid

Achieving this vision entails the development of tools that can facilitate patient-provider conversations. To that end, they have adapted the BRAIN Informed Decision Making tool from the International Childbirth Association.

At the recent BC Patient Safety Quality Council's Quality Forum (#QF16), I was asked to give a talk on Choosing Wisely and was put into the "Patient Empowerment" breakout session. It was fortuitous that my talk preceded that of the CCMI team as I got to see their presentation on the tool and learn about its development (slides accessible here).

Helping a patient to explore the [B]enefits, [R]isks, [A]lternatives, their [I]ntuition, and [N]ext steps, the BRAIN tool can assist people navigating any significant health choice.

You can view and download the PDF on the CCMI's website. The simple format and generalizability means it could easily become a 'go to' tool for patients and clinicians who wish to engage in shared decision-making.

Please feel free to leave your feedback on this tool in the comments section below; the input can be forwarded to the CCMI team. Has it been a helpful tool for you as a patient or caregiver? Do your patients find the format straightforward?
 

More

Seeking more tools like this to facilitate patient-provider discussions around important health choices? Less is More includes a list of mainly Shared Decision Making Tools, in the hands-on resource section.

Source: http://www.centrecmi.ca/wp-content/uploads...