I love Healthcare Triage! VIDEO: Malpractice, Healthcare Costs, and Tort Reform

Dr Aaron Carroll (@aaronecarroll) & Co. are amazing!

Healthcare Triage (@HCTriage) has a YouTube channel that hosts a range of videos, most of which pertain to the "Less is More in Medicine" movement. The Less is More blog has featured their work before, 1) when Healthcare Triage did a video about Choosing Wisely, and 2) when Dr Carroll wrote Why Survival Rate Is Not the Best Way to Judge Cancer Spending for Upshot in the NY Times. In early June, they posted another great video, busting some major medico-legal myths.

One of the main excuses physicians make for ordering too many tests and treatments is that they have to practice defensive medicine. You must 'cover your ass' (CYA) to ensure nothing is missed, lest you face a horrible lawsuit. Physicians pay a ransom to malpractice insurance in order to help protect their reputation (and earnings) should a case come forward.

Many frivolous lawsuits exist and a lot of poor care is not legally pursued. Physicians think that tort reform will solve everything. Not so. Watch the video to learn more:

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sK-E_d1MGt...

How residency programs are training doctors to waste money - Vox

It makes sense that our practice patterns are very much influenced by where and with whom we train. Why should there be any exception when it comes to over-ordering tests and treatments?

A recent study in JAMA, Spending Patterns in Region of Residency Training and Subsequent Expenditures for Care Provided by Practicing Physicians for Medicare Beneficiaries, shows that where we train has implications for high-value care.

Residents who train in regions with high health care costs (that is, the places that err on the side of more scans and specialists) continue to practice expensive medicine decades beyond graduation — even if they move to low-cost parts of the country.
The JAMA paper suggests a tantalizingly easy way to save money in American health care: train more residents in low-cost areas of the country. They would learn, from the get-go, to be more frugal physicians. If there was a way for the health care system to cut 7 percent of all spending just by training doctors differently, after all, you'd think we'd jump at it.
But, like most things in health policy, this is easier said than done.

Read more on Vox.