JUST RELEASED: #RightCare Series in The Lancet

The Lown Institute has just announced the release of the Right Care Series, a collection of articles on overuse and underuse of medical care around the world, published in The Lancet:

"The full series of papers is available free to read online, along with our authors' commentary, a commentary by Don Berwick, and an editorial by Richard Horton & Sabine Kleinert of The Lancet. [The hops is that] you'll share the papers with your colleagues and others you think might be interested. You can also participate in the ongoing conversation about the papers on social media, by following us on Twitter and using the hashtag #rightcare. . .

The series is also a great opportunity to start a conversation about right care with friends and family. [They] have created a short explainer in non-technical language that lays out the key points from the article, including why it's crucial for patients and community advocates to take a leading role in decisions about how countries allocate their health resources."

(taken from a release by Vikas Saini, President, Lown Institute)

There are two other medical journals featuring similar collections: 

I also collect articles from diverse sources here:

 

 

Source: http://www.thelancet.com/series/right-care

No benefit to locked mental health wards: 15yr study

A once 'sound' idea is now in question.

A 15-year study has concluded that there is no benefit in locking up many mentally ill patients.

Looking at about 350k cases, the researchers selected 145 738 cases, matched for propensity around suicide attempts. In open units, elopement and suicide attempts were less frequent than in locked units.

An open-door policy could be preferable for those with depression, anxiety or psychosis, as it promoted a better therapeutic atmosphere and more positive health outcomes

Even if this large study is imperfect, it gives us a perfect illustration that what seems sensible or logical does not necessarily result in the expected outcome. Although it makes sense that locking people up should not only help them stay put but also keep them safe,, that seems not to be the case.

Counterintuitive? Yes. But brains and bodies often do not conform to the rules of logic. This is in part due to the fact that we have only a superficial understanding of the complexity of our behaviours and physiology. 

How else are we hurting people when we think we are helping them? 

The full article is in Lancet Psychiatry

Source: http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programm...