Pre-Osteoarthritis: Do we really need another "Pre-" disease?

This Spring, Dr Annemarie Jutel (RN, BPhEd(hons), PhD) from the Victoria University of Wellington shared with m some of her work on Social Issues in Diagnosis.

Dr Jutel is a social theorist and clinician interested in finding an understanding of just how diagnosis works, whether from the historical, linguistic, social, literary, clinical, or other angle. 

She explained: 

I am most interested in the “diagnostic moment” and the power of the diagnostic utterance; there is nothing that fundamentally changes in your soma from the moment you walk in to the doctor’s rooms, and the moment you get your diagnosis, but at the same time, if the diagnosis is a difficult one, everything has changed. 

I started following her posts on the Facebook Group, Social Issues in Diagnosis, which explores why and how we create these labels and what impact they have on patients and the course of medicine.

The most recent post is about pre-diagnosis, stimulated by this 2015 paper in Cartilage. If we can detect osteoarthritis before it starts, maybe we can stem the epidemic. Or, maybe we can turn a bunch of healthy, naturally aging, well-people into frightened patients?

In response to the article, Jutel asks:

What is a prediagnosis and what are its consequences? 

If pre-diagnosis states are, potentially, windows of opportunity, wherein individuals can adopt healthy, disease-avoidance behaviours, is there an advantage to calling these states "pre-whatever" as opposed to identifying them as healthy states, wherein health can be further improved?

What are the consequences of being given a pre-diagnosis? For some it may be a scary moment which marks their identity forever more. For others, it may be a wake-up call.

What would it be for you?

Take a look on the FB Group to participate or to learn more, see her book, Social Issues in Diagnosis.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26175...