COURSE: Practising Wisely - Reducing Unnecessary Testing and Treatment

When I speak to peers and clinicians, one of the most frequent bits of feedback I receive is "Great! I'm on board with delivering more appropriate care, Choosing Wisely, making sure my patients make shared decisions and avoid unnecessary tests and treatments. But... I don't really know how to 'do' it. Where do I start? How to I talk to patients? Where do I go to practice?"

So, it is with extreme pleasure that I announce the expansion of the Practicing Wisely: Reducing Unnecessary Testing and Treatment Course. Originally "Don't just do something, Stand there!," this highly-regarded hands-on learning experience was started by the Ontario College of Family Physicians and is spearheaded by Dr Jennifer Young.

It is now a suite of continuing professional development opportunities for primary care providers, available in a modular format across the country. In the course: 

Participants will identify opportunities to "practise wisely", with a focus on reducing over-prescribing, over-imaging, over-screening and over-monitoring using the latest evidence and tools from diverse sources. This workshop aligns closely with the Choosing Wisely Canada (CWC) campaign to implement good healthcare stewardship and avoid over-medicalization.

The program centres on case studies and incorporates individual reflection and group work. It helps participants to build communication skills to guide their patients through the shift from seeking sickness to enhancing health.


After active engagement in this program, participants will be better able to:

  • Identify opportunities to reduce “too much medicine”
  • Access and assess reliable, renewing online resources
  • Integrate relevant evidence into individual patient care
  • Communicate and build consensus with patients to reduce over-medicalization

    Upcoming Workshops are taking place as follows:

    May 24/17 - Montreal
    May 29/17 - Ottawa
    June 3/17 - Newfoundland
    Nov 22/17 - Toronto

    Find out more about the Practising Wisely program by viewing the main website or reading through this Q&A with Course Director, Dr. Jennifer Young.

    Source: http://ocfp.on.ca/cpd/practising-wisely

    Demanding Patients? Not so in Oncology

    Surveyed physicians tend to place responsibility for high medical costs more on “demanding patients” than themselves. However, there are few data about the frequency of demanding patients, clinical appropriateness of their demands, and clinicians’ compliance with them.

    Exactly. This JAMA Oncology paper looked at 5050 patient-provider encounters in the oncology context and found that patients requested things in 8.7% of the encounters, and these demands were only considered inappropriate in 1% of encounters.

    Number and Types of Patient Requests or Demands (JAMA Onc)

    Number and Types of Patient Requests or Demands (JAMA Onc)

    I think we need to be very careful about blaming patients. I do it... but I'm getting better at seeing the bigger picture. Yes, sometimes they are in the stage of denial and struggling to cope with their diagnosis. They may ask for completely inappropriate tests or treatments. Sometimes their expectations are absolutely ridiculous but most of the time this is not the case. The patient is not crazy or 'demanding.' A lot of the time it is we clinicians who put some of the more unrealistic expectations on people's radar.

    Educating patients wouldn't change this, except if we can encourage them à la Choosing Wisely to initiate discussions with their physicians about unnecessary tests and treatments.  Educating the clinician, particularly encouraging transparency and openness in communication is really important. However, the biggest thing we can do is to change the overall culture of the health 'system' and our society to make it "okay" to talk about these issues frankly.

    I work quite frequently with oncology patients, often in a supportive or palliative role. I find it shocking that many of them have never discussed dying, have not made advanced care plans, and do not understand the goals of their treatment. Often a patient is receiving palliative therapy and yet they believe it is a curative therapy. They may demand aggressive medical treatment, not realizing that they are very close to dying.

    Sometimes, when I liaise with the oncologist, he or she explains that they had frank discussions about these things, and I can see it in the notes. It's just been hard to accept and people don't really hear what has been said. Other times, "it just never came up." I find that that hard to believe. It should come up. Shouldn't it?

    Not talking about the end of life is doing a patient a disserviceHow can they make decisions about their care without knowing what is going on? It also suggests - as made clear by this study -  that inappropriate interventions might be coming from the clinician, not necessarily initiated at the behest of the patient.

    What do you think?

    Source: http://oncology.jamanetwork.com/article.as...