BCMJ Book Review: The Patient Paradox: Why sexed-up medicine is bad for your health

At the Preventing Overdiagnosis conference last year in Oxford, I heard Dr Margaret McCartney speak. This is a passionate woman, one who advocates tirelessly for patients and follows the motto "Think critically and demand evidence." She is an outspoken leader, holding the NHS, her patients, her peers, and herself to high standards, eschewing conflict of interest and junk science.

I was lucky to meet her and when we talked further, Margaret handed me a copy of her book, The Patient Paradox: Why sexed-up medicine is bad for your health. Travel and work got in the way of me opening it, but when I did, I devoured it, underlining and folding and marking key points that resonated with me.

I have read many essays and a few books in the area of "too much medicine," and agreed with most of what they had to say. This book was different. It gained my trust by talking about things I already knew and accepted (more is not always better in medicine) and pushed me just outside my comfort zone, to question things I take for granted (eg the importance of pap tests). I admire the bold way in which she can push the already skeptical to challenge assumptions we didn't even know we had. Since I felt the need to share this book with others, I wrote it up.

You can read my piece about the book and its message in the July/August copy of the British Columbia Medical Journal (BCMJ).
 

You can buy the book from the publisher, Pinter and Martin here. If you want to read other reviews or get a copy on Kindle, Amazon.ca can help.* 

If you like the idea of reading more on the subject of "Less is More in Medicine," there are about 20 books in the Read section of the site, ranging in focus from cancer screening or overdiagnosis in psychiatry to patient-centered care, achieving evidence-based medicine, and turning healthy people into sick.

 

 

 

* I don't receive any kickbacks here, just hoping to make it easy to get the book in your hands

Source: http://www.pinterandmartin.com/the-patient...