Minimally disruptive medicine: Effective Care that Fits Workshop SEPT 2016

I read the fantastic Minimally Disruptive Medicine (MDM) Blog and want to bring your attention to the Mayo Clinic KER Unit MDM event, coming soon:

From the MDM site:

Click on the image to find out more about the Minimally Disruptive Medicine Workshop.

Minimally disruptive medicine (MDM) seeks to advance patient goals for health, health care, and life, using effective care programs designed and implemented in a manner that respects the capacity of patients and caregivers and minimizes the burden of treatment – the healthcare footprint – the care program imposes on their lives.

This site is maintained by researchers at the KER UNIT who are part of an international research team that is working on understanding and implementing MDM across the world.

Some introductions to MDM:
From the peer-reviewed press
From the medical press
From the lay press
From Wikipedia
From a presentation (video) 
From a radio interview (audio)
Complexity Care Model article

 


For more events related to "Less is More," "Choosing Wisely," "Preventing Overdiagnosis," "Shared Decision-Making," etc, go here.

VIDEO: Making Decisions With, Not for, Patients

Dr Victor Montori (@vmontori) is a leader in the area of shared decision-making (SDM) and minimally disruptive medicine.

In this interview by his colleague, Advanced Cardiology Fellow, Dr Selma F Mohammed, Dr Montori highlights what shared decision-making is, why it is important, whether patients want it, and how to do it.

The video is a great introduction to the idea, and could be a wonderful teaching tool for medical students or clinicians in practice.

Montori holds our feet to the fire:

It all starts by caring enough to engage the patient in the decision-making. Many people argue that
     'We don't have time for this in the consultation. I'd rather just tell people what I think is best for           them and then they can decide whether they want it or not.'
Well, that's not very caring. This might be efficient, but it does not reflect the best that we can offer.

This guy is my hero!

Watch the video:  Making Decisions With Not for, Patients

If you like the idea of the shared decision-making tools they mentioned, check out the Less is More Medicine's collection of different ones in the Hands-On Tools section.

Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/844541